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I will always reblog this man’s photography. Most decadent waves ever pictured.

Corey Arnold

Outer-site Art

Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.

Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.

But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

Alinta Krauth 

Via Art and Science Journal

manpodcast:

This weeks’ Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights three collection-driven exhibitions that mark the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. The three exhibitions — at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Toledo Museum of Art and at the Dallas Museum of Art — take strikingly different approaches to showing how the Great War impacted artists. 

On the second segment, the Toledo Museum of Art’s Paula Reich discusses her exhibition "The Great War: Art on the Front Line," which is up through October 19. The show features paintings, sculpture and works on paper about the war and the home front. Among the highlights of the exhibition are Max Beckmann’s great 1923 painting The Trapeze, Picasso’s 1918 gouache Person Seated at a Table Plucking a Dead Bird, and Otto Dix’s great 1924 print of shell craters. 

This is Kathe Kollwitz’s 1921-22 woodcut The Parents, from the portfolio “The War.” It’s included in the Toledo show. View the e-catalogue of all the works in Toledo’s exhibition here.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

oranbeg:

Oranbeg Inquires: Jeremy August Haik

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 

I’m from DC/Baltimore originally, currently living in Brooklyn.

What is the work you are currently focusing on? 

A lot of my work over the past few years has involved scanning found materials and images, but lately I’ve been incorporating a lot more studio and still life shooting into the work. I’m endlessly curious about the path an image can take as it gets copied and modified from the original image to a printed copy to a website or phone, maybe back into another photograph (and on and on). I’ve been collecting images and other printed material from various sources and finding as many ways as possible to replicate this cycle of replication and modification. I’ve been making a lot of polaroids lately as well, and those are starting to find their way into the work both as stand alone pieces and as objects within larger compositions. What the results of all of this suggest to me is a form of altered or alternative history that comes about by the collision between elements that might not have the chance to meet otherwise. Kind of a Craigslist missed connections but in the language of images instead of text.
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
I think there’s no time like the present for photography because it’s such a big part of our culture in a broad and global sense. That might sound tired or obvious, and I actually feel like the critical discourse surrounding photography is a little stale at the moment. Nevertheless, it doesn’t lessen the impact images and photography have on culture at large, which is just immeasurable. I think it’s common knowledge that we’re living in a radically new kind of cultural landscape that has sprung up within the last few decades because of the availability of image-making tools, and I don’t think any of us can really step back far enough it in order to observe its effects; it’s hard to comment on something so large when you’re living inside of it. But all of this boils down to it being a really exciting and promising time for photography.
What does this mean for artists working in photography? I think the second part of your question about the state of photobooks is one answer. You could argue, on the one hand, that artists have a profound need to stand apart from the crowd, to be different in some way. Refusing to participate (wholly) in the prevailing tide of digital images is one way of doing this. If I make a digital photograph and put it online anyone can have it and the experience is always the same.  But if I rarefy that image by only printing it in limited quantities in book form I condense the experience to one person at a time, and presumably this makes it more intimate, personal and special.  On the other hand, you could argue that it has less to do with individual motives and is more broadly the result of a wholesale dissatisfaction with the coldness and aloofness that a largely digital existence engenders. Either way, though, I think making books and putting them into peoples hands is about creating a personal and intimate space for art, and it seems like a lot of artists are looking for a way to do that right now.

Favorite Photo Blog?

I think Paper Journal is pretty great for photos. Probably my favorite art blog is likeafieldmouse, but it’s not strictly photography. I also really like the NY Times lively morgue blog.  

Favorite Photobook? 

That’s really hard to say. I’m really into Sara Cwynar’s Kitch Encyclopedia, I just got my copy in the mail last week. If I had to pick one book though, it would probably be Penelope Umbrico:Photographs.

Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Jeremy has an interleaf.

**Send in a submission for Beta deadline June 23!

nycrecords:

The Department of Records Celebrates Women’s Equality Day:

In 1971, at the behest of Bella Abzug, Congress declared August 26 as “Women’s Equality Day.” The day commemorates the enactment of the 19th amendment which gave women the right to vote.  But even more, in 1971 the day honored the efforts of contemporary women activists who re-launched the fight for equality throughout society.  

In 2014, we continue to advocate gender equality. For example, women earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by men, on average.   Women are often the primary caregivers in 70% of households.  This struggle informs the work of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration.  The administration’s programs such as comprehensive paid sick leave and universal pre-Kindergarten are major advances that will positively impact working women and families.  We celebrate these programs and continue to advance the fight for equity.

Between Women’s Equality Day in 2014 and 2020, the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, DORIS will coordinate a multi-year series of events celebrating the empowerment of women in New York City. Learn more and see more photographs here.

fucking-history:

Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck was a general of the Imperial German army in World War I in the East Africa campaign. With a force that never exceeded 14,000, he used guerrilla tactics to check a British, Portuguese, and Belgian force numbering 300,000 without experiencing any defeats. After the war, he helped lead the Freikorps against the Spartacists in the January Uprising (Image: Library of Congress). 

fucking-history:

Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck was a general of the Imperial German army in World War I in the East Africa campaign. With a force that never exceeded 14,000, he used guerrilla tactics to check a British, Portuguese, and Belgian force numbering 300,000 without experiencing any defeats. After the war, he helped lead the Freikorps against the Spartacists in the January Uprising (Image: Library of Congress). 

amnhnyc:

This #MuseumMonday, we’re featuring the Ellsworth Corridor. 
This area on the Museum’s first floor just off the Grand Gallery celebrates a relatively unsung hero of polar exploration: the American Lincoln Ellsworth. His bust graces the back wall of the narrow hallway, while the display cases on either side contain artifacts detailing Ellsworth’s efforts to become the first man to fly across both polar continents, a feat he accomplished in 1935 when he crossed the Antarctic in his plane Polar Star. Ten years earlier, Ellsworth’s first attempt to fly over the North Pole teamed him with Norwegian Roald Amundsen, whose earlier overland competition with British Royal Navy Captain Robert Falcon Scott to reach the South Pole is chronicled in the Museum’s traveling exhibition Race to the End of the Earth. Through the special relationship between Amundsen and Ellsworth, the Museum Library’s Memorabilia Collection came to possess items the Norwegian explorer carried with him on his quest to reach the South Pole, including a sledge, chronometer, binoculars, shotgun, and a tin cup from the ship Fram, which are featured in the corridor.
Explore other halls on this #MuseumMonday!

Lovelovelove

amnhnyc:

This #MuseumMonday, we’re featuring the Ellsworth Corridor. 

This area on the Museum’s first floor just off the Grand Gallery celebrates a relatively unsung hero of polar exploration: the American Lincoln Ellsworth. His bust graces the back wall of the narrow hallway, while the display cases on either side contain artifacts detailing Ellsworth’s efforts to become the first man to fly across both polar continents, a feat he accomplished in 1935 when he crossed the Antarctic in his plane Polar Star. Ten years earlier, Ellsworth’s first attempt to fly over the North Pole teamed him with Norwegian Roald Amundsen, whose earlier overland competition with British Royal Navy Captain Robert Falcon Scott to reach the South Pole is chronicled in the Museum’s traveling exhibition Race to the End of the Earth. Through the special relationship between Amundsen and Ellsworth, the Museum Library’s Memorabilia Collection came to possess items the Norwegian explorer carried with him on his quest to reach the South Pole, including a sledge, chronometer, binoculars, shotgun, and a tin cup from the ship Fram, which are featured in the corridor.

Explore other halls on this #MuseumMonday!

Lovelovelove