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Kawashima Kotori 川島小鳥
 - Mirai-chan 未来ちゃん

Kotori Kawashima 川島小鳥 is a Tokyo born photographer, graduated from Waseda university. He started Mirai-chan 未来ちゃん photo series after meeting his friend’s child: “I was amazed by this creature. I wanted to take pictures of her after spending time with her during one year… I think the children are free, it is very interesting to listen to what they say, not boring to watch them, and they are so energetic. Everyone have a childish side, so I love to find it in my friends and people I meet for work.” (cf. Kitsuné)

La Jetée (Chris Marker, 1962)

I will never get over this movie. Every time, breaks my heart.

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 
Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 
In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 
Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 
Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling. 

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Roald Amundsen, leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole. 

Born to a family of Norwegian shipowners on July 16, 1872, Amundsen knew by the age of 15 that he would one day be an explorer. 

In one of the most stirring tales in the annals of Antarctic exploration, the contest to reach the South Pole was between two leaders—Roald Amundsen on the Norwegian side and Robert Falcon Scott on the British—and the challenges they faced as they undertook their separate 1,800-mile journeys from the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole and back. 

Amundsen was a meticulous planner; he realized that success was sure only if he correctly estimated the risks he would face, leaving little to chance. On the afternoon of December 14, 1911, Roald Amundsen and his team reached the geographical South Pole, had had won the race. 

Learn more about Amundsen and Scott’s expeditions in the exhibition Race to the End of the Earth, currently traveling

Smart page with string

These pages from a late-16th-century scientific manuscript share a most unusual feature: they contain a string that runs through a pierced hole. Dozens of them are found in this book. The pages contain diagrams that accompany astronomical tracts. They show such things as the working of the astrolabe (Pic 1), the position of the stars (Pic 4), and the movement of the sun (Pic 6). The book was written and copied by the cartographer Jean du Temps of Blois (born 1555), about whom little appears to be known. The book contains a number of volvelles or wheel charts: revolving disks that the reader would turn to execute calculations. The strings seen in these images are another example of the “hands-on” kind of reading the book facilitates. Pulling the string tight and moving it from left to right, or all the way around, would connect different bits of data, like a modern computer: the string drew a temporary line between two or more values, highlighting their relationship. The tiny addition made the physical page as smart as its contents.

Pics: London, British Library, Harley MS 3263: more on this book here; and full digital reproduction here.

From Erik Kwakkel, Medieval book historian at Leiden University, The Netherlands

Photographer Bryan Alexander has travelled Siberia documenting the lives of the Chukchi, Dolgan, E’ven, Khanty, Komi, Nenets, and Nganasan people, showing their traditional camps, transportation and dress. See more »

(via guardian)